Barrichello schumacher relationship tips

Ferrari have impressive plans for Michael Schumacher's upcoming birthday

barrichello schumacher relationship tips

Apr 17, Rubens Barrichello has revealed that he recently had a mild stroke and The former Ferrari driver and teammate of Michael Schumacher said. Sep 27, Only last Thursday, Irvine and Rubens Barrichello were "confirmed" as Jordan- Peugeot's pairing for , while Ferrari planned to test four. Mar 8, So, is Michael Schumacher killing formula one? In a rare Rubens Barrichello has picked up his game quite a lot. Then there is my . This is the sport I love, and in some ways it's my job, and accidents happen every so often Driving a Theirs is one of the circuit's strongest relationships. They met in.

The boy was very special. I had never heard of him. His name was Michael Schumacher.

The rivalries: A look back at the men that spurred Michael Schumacher on to F1 glory

Two days later the Formula One circus descended on the small Ardennes town of Spa-Francorchamps, and a blond, green-eyed year-old stepped into the Jordan car and into motor racing history. He astounded everyone by qualifying seventh on the grid.

To fully comprehend the brilliance of this performance you have to realise that, except for a brief outing at Silverstone, Schumacher had never driven a Formula One car before and had never driven round Spa a fiendishly difficult track that requires a large dollop of testicular courage. Four of them world champions. In the race itself, three days later, Schumacher's car broke down and he retired after one lap. Within hours of the race the Benetton team were in contact; within days they had signed him up.

At the next race, the Italian Grand Prix, Schumacher drove superbly to finish in fifth, another incredible result. In little more than a fortnight a star had been born. He won his first grand prix a year after his debut, in Spa, and by the end of that season, still in his early twenties, was widely regarded as the man to watch - not least by Senna who ruled the roost at the time.

He recalls Senna's reaction after the two had a spectacular shunt during the French Grand Prix. Schumacher listened respectfully, then Senna walked back with a broad grin. Whatever the Brazilian did, however, failed to slow his new rival down very much, and some observers feel the pressure Schumacher exerted on Senna during the San Marino Grand Prix played a significant part in driving the Brazilian that little bit too close to the edge.

Senna crashed and died that day at Imola. Schumacher was just 25 and Senna's death robbed F1 of perhaps its greatest rivalry. Schumacher won the world title that year and, in Senna's absence, became the benchmark as the Brazilian had. In he joined Ferrari, then a moribund team, struggling to live up to its past, but in time Schumacher and an influx of engineers and designers transformed it into a title-winning machine.

Inafter 21 barren years, Ferrari boasted the world drivers' champion again - and they have refused to relinquish the title since. Schumacher - winning 29 of the 50 races in the past three years - has been the dominant force.

  • So Michael, where did it all go wrong?
  • Rubens Barrichello: Michael Schumacher benefited from team orders to win Formula One titles
  • Ferrari have impressive plans for Michael Schumacher's upcoming birthday

And with the dominance has come the dosh. Forbes ranked him as the sixth best-paid world celebrity. The problem now is that Schumacher is, quite simply, too good and the sport is suffering as a result.

The television ratings are dropping, interest is waning. A couple of months ago the teams were forced by Max Mosley, president of the sport's governing body, into a series of sweeping rule changes aimed at making F1 more exciting.

The official reason behind taking electronic aids and traction control out of the sport is to make it cheaper and simpler. But, in a sense, all the changes could be said to be aimed at one core problem - Michael Schumacher. The reason why motor racing has become predictable is simple: Schumacher wins too often and too easily. If he lost a bit more, those who run F1 acknowledge, then the product they are selling would become a lot more marketable again.

It's enough to give a man a persecution complex. To find out whether Schumacher does indeed feel put upon, I travelled to Barcelona on a cold winter's morning as Ferrari began pre-season testing in earnest.

barrichello schumacher relationship tips

Schumacher insists he is happy with the rule changes. When he started out, he says, he was driving cars with very little electronics built into them. So he'll be fine when he has to drive like that again. But he wonders how some of the younger drivers will cope.

It is something he is aware of, but feels he can do nothing about. He is not a big man - a shade over 5ft 7in, a little over 10 stone - yet there seems to be more of him. If he is unworried by the changes about to occur within his sport, he bridles at the suggestion that last year, when he won 11 of 17 races, was easy for him.

I have been in Formula One for 12 years, and out of that I had one year with the perfect car,' he says with a hint of irritation. His uncompromising style did not go down well with his rivals, nor did it impress the sport's authorities. He clashed with Damon Hill, Jacques Villeneuve and David Coulthard and in he was disqualified from the championship. In fact their colourful rivalry was just about the one newsworthy aspect to last season though it barely constituted a rivalry, with Montoya failing to win a single race.

Does he still regard the Colombian as his biggest threat when the new season starts in Melbourne next Sunday? But I would not focus on that single person. My team-mate Rubens Barrichello has picked up his game quite a lot. Then there is my brother Ralf, and Kimi Raikkonen. I would mention all of these in the same bracket as Montoya.

But the media seems to have picked out one over the others. Off the circuit they have become friends, and if there is a party, they'll often arrive together. And, also contrary to the stereotype, Schumacher is something of a party animal, usually outlasting everyone on the dance floor.

He is, after all, famously fit. The championship last year was Schumacher's third in a Ferrari and his success has seen the team reclaim its traditional aura of glamorous invincibility.

Not that the aura, or the tradition, were his motives for joining. It was a challenge to go there because they had been so unsuccessful. But now I feel that I understand the brand and know what it feels to drive for them. It is amazing to see how the Italian people are involved with their team.

For them it's like a parent or the Pope. The whole country is behind us, not just a city, like for a football club. The way they love their Ferrari makes it clear it is something very special. They are very happy and proud for what you have achieved. And it feels as if you have achieved it together with them. He all but discounts the possibility. They have offered me to stay as long as I feel like driving.

And that is the best compliment a team can give a driver.

barrichello schumacher relationship tips

The country that had dominated motor sport in the pre- and postwar years through Mercedes and Auto Union seemed to have stopped competing at the highest level, and even during Schumacher's formative years the only German to enjoy even limited success was the journeyman Jochen Mass.

How then did this country produce one of the greatest drivers of all time? Rubens Barrichello has picked up his game quite a lot. Then there is my brother, Ralf, and Kimi Raikkonen. I would mention all of these in the same bracket as Montoya. But the media seems to have picked out one over the others.

Off the circuit, they have become friends, and if there is a party, they'll often arrive together. And, also contrary to the stereotype, Schumacher is something of a party animal, usually outlasting everyone on the dance floor. He is, after all, famously fit. The championship last year was Schumacher's third in a Ferrari and his success has seen the team reclaim its traditional aura of glamorous invincibility.

barrichello schumacher relationship tips

Not that the aura, or the tradition, were his motives for joining. It was a challenge to go there because they had been so unsuccessful. But now I feel that I understand the brand and know what it feels to drive for them. It is amazing to see how the Italian people are involved with their team. For them, it's like a parent or the Pope. The whole country is behind us, not just a city, like for a football club. They are very happy and proud for what you have achieved.

And it feels as if you have achieved it together with them. He all but discounts the possibility. They have offered me to stay as long as I feel like driving. And that is the best compliment a team can give a driver. The country that had dominated motor sport in the pre- and post-war years through Mercedes and Auto Union seemed to have stopped competing at the highest level.

How then did this country produce one of the greatest drivers of all time? It was in his blood, that's how. Michael's father, Rolf, was the manager of a modest karting track in the small town of Kerpen, just outside Cologne. It was a labour of love for Rolf, who maintained the karts as well as the track and all the facilities his mother Elisabeth made the coffee and sandwichesand had to work as bricklayer to supplement his income.

Michael drove his first pedal-driven kart at the age of four. When his father found an abandoned moped half-submerged in a nearby lake, retrieved the engine and then rebuilt and fitted it into the pedal kart, Michael had his first engine to play with.

His big break came in when he met Willi Weber, who ran a formula three team. Schumacher's impact was immediate and Weber remained a valued adviser long after Schumacher had moved on from his team. He gave it, in cash, in a suitcase to his father. He couldn't believe it. That was something very special. People joked about his accent. They resented his emphasis on fitness, characterising him as some kind of freak.

He was seen as the epitome of a new, ruthlessly efficient kind of driver, in contrast to the colourful, playboy image of the sport's past. All these complaints had at their core one feature: I remember a television interview with him early in his career, at the Belgian Grand Prix.

After Schumacher had left, a British journalist told me he could not forget that he had fought bitter battles against the Germans in the Ardennes. And it wasn't just the British - when Schumacher joined Ferrari, many Italians were uneasy about a German driving their beloved car better than any Italian could.

Rubens: I can learn from Schumacher - F1 news - japancarnews.info

Is he aware of the prejudice? They write stories about me, often to justify themselves, without looking at how I got to win the race. A simple explanation sometimes doesn't justify the success you have. It all depends what you feel you are. I know what I am, and what I have to do in my profession, so I can handle the pressure.

It's the way I think. Some say the key is his phenomenal level of fitness. He has always played lots of sports, and incorporates soccer, skiing, one-on-one basketball and mountain-biking into his fearsome schedule.

Others think it's his mental powers, but he smiles at any suggestion he might benefit from mental exercises, such as visualisation and meditation. Schumacher's greatest talent may be his ability to adapt quickly, to make so many instant decisions correctly during the heat of a race. Talking to him, you can see why some are tempted to over-analyse Schumacher. He is refreshingly modest. His body language is reserved, he doesn't physically take up much space.

He is blessed with extraordinary ability, both physical and mental, and finds it hard to articulate what sets him apart.

To him, it is all just natural and instinctive. Today's stringent safety requirements mean there are now significantly fewer fatalities, but it remains a high-risk profession. Senna once told me that he dealt with his fears by overcoming each instance at the time, and then building up his courage through each small victory over fear.

Each year he had more bricks. Does Schumacher ever get scared?