Competitive relationship in the desert

Sahara Desert- Symbiotic Relationships, Predation & Competition by Oliver Ng-liang on Prezi

competitive relationship in the desert

The Desert Coyote and the Sidewinder Rattle snake are examples of competition . Competing birds such as the Desert Eagle and the Nubian Bustards fight for Desert Symbiotic Relationships · 3 Examples of Competition. The Nile crocodile and Egyptian plover. Here the crocodile will open its mouth wide open for the birds to enter. These birds will then feed on the. Competitive relationships in a biological community can help the fittest Desert plants have developed shallow, far-reaching roots systems to.

competitive relationship in the desert

This results in the survival of the fittest, only those capable of winning against their counterparts survive. Similar regulation occurs when individuals compete over shelter for raising young. This is often occurs with young male lions; Animals that lose are driven from the group and from the area. Sciencing Video Vault When Different Species Compete Interspecific competition occurs when members of more than one species compete for the same resource.

Woodpeckers and squirrels often compete for nesting rights in the same holes and spaces in trees, while the lions and cheetahs of the African savanna compete for the same antelope and gazelle prey.

competitive relationship in the desert

Even though individual animals are competing for the same shelter or food, interspecific competition is usually less critical than intraspecific competition. The antelope, for example, is not the lion's only prey.

Because of this, the lion can choose to compete for antelope or to look elsewhere. Animals of different species typically compete with each other only for food, water and shelter. But they often compete with members of their own species for mates and territory as well. Plant Competition Plants also compete for space, nutrients and resources such as water and sunlight.

competitive relationship in the desert

This competition can shape how the ecosystem looks. Taller trees shield a forest's understory -- the ground beneath the forest's tree-top canopy -- from sunlight, making it hard for anything to grow but the most shade-tolerant plants. The life cycles of some plants are also impacted because many shorter plants flower and bear seeds before the leaves of the taller trees are fully developed, which makes it possible for shorter plants to receive sunlight.

Desert plants have developed shallow, far-reaching roots systems to successfully compete for valuable water resources, which is an example of how competition can affect the evolution of a species. In fact, they have many different types of interactions with each other, and many of these interactions are critical for their survival. So what do these interactions look like in an ecosystem?

One category of interactions describes the different ways organisms obtain their food and energy. Some organisms can make their own food, and other organisms have to get their food by eating other organisms.

Desert Biome: 3 Examples of Competition

An organism that must obtain their nutrients by eating consuming other organisms is called a consumer, or a heterotroph. While there are a lot of fancy words related to the sciences, one of the great things is that many of them are based on Latin or Greek roots. They then use the energy and materials in that food to grow, reproduce and carry out all of their life activities. All animals, all fungi, and some kinds of bacteria are heterotrophs and consumers.

Some consumers are predators; they hunt, catch, kill, and eat other animals, the prey. The prey animal tries to avoid being eaten by hiding, fleeing, or defending itself using various adaptations and strategies.

These could be the camouflage of an octopus or a fawn, the fast speed of a jackrabbit or impala, or the sting of a bee or spines of a sea urchin. If the prey is not successful, it becomes a meal and energy source for the predator. If the prey is successful and eludes its predator, the predator must expend precious energy to continue the hunt elsewhere. Predators can also be prey, depending on what part of the food chain you are looking at. For example, a trout acts as a predator when it eats insects, but it is prey when it is eaten by a bear.

Symbiotic Relationships-Definition and Examples-Mutualism,Commensalism,Parasitism

It all depends on the specific details of the interaction. Ecologists use other specific names that describe what type of food a consumer eats: Omnivores eat both animals and plants. Once again, knowing the Latin root helps a lot: For example, an insectivore is a carnivore that eats insects, and a frugivore is an herbivore that eats fruit. This may seem like a lot of terminology, but it helps scientists communicate and immediately understand a lot about a particular type of organism by using the precise terms.

Ecological interactions

Not all organisms need to eat others for food and energy. Some organisms have the amazing ability to make produce their own energy-rich food molecules from sunlight and simple chemicals. Organisms that make their own food by using sunlight or chemical energy to convert simple inorganic molecules into complex, energy-rich organic molecules like glucose are called producers or autotrophs.

Some producers are chemosynthesizers using chemicals to make food rather than photosynthesizers; instead of using sunlight as the source of energy to make energy-rich molecules, these bacteria and their relatives use simple chemicals as their source of energy.

Chemosynthesizers live in places with no sunlight, such as along oceanic vents at great depths on the ocean floor. No matter how long you or a giraffe stands out in the sun, you will never be able to make food by just soaking up the sunshine; you will never be able to photosynthesize.

Producers use the food that they make and the chemical energy it contains to meet their own needs for building-block molecules and energy so that they can do things such as grow, move, and reproduce. All other life depends on the energy-rich food molecules made by producers — either directly by eating producers, or indirectly by eating organisms that have eaten producers. Not surprisingly, ecologists also have terms that describe where in the food chain a particular consumer operates.

competitive relationship in the desert

A primary consumer eats producers e. And it can go even further: A single individual animal can act as a different type of consumer depending on what it is eating.

competitive relationship in the desert